There are two primary types of brain tumour. Low-grade, benign tumours are non-cancerous, grow slowly and are generally less dangerous. Malignant tumours are high grade and cancerous, and receiving the news that you have one can be overwhelming.

WHY VOLUNTEER WITH A BRAIN TUMOUR CHARITY?

Most of us have either been directly affected by cancer or know someone who has. It's a devastating disease, but knowing there's brain tumour support out there can be a real comfort both to patients and their loved ones.

If helping other people is important to you, then you could be perfect for volunteering. Donating your time to a brain tumour charity is a great way to feel like you're giving something back in an area that really needs and will appreciate your help.

HOW TO HELP BRAIN TUMOUR CHARITIES

BECOME A SUPPORT VOLUNTEER

Providing practical and emotional support to brain tumour patients is invaluable. Whether it's helping with the first steps on the road to recovery after a release from hospital, or being there for someone who may not have long to live, being a figure of strength and kindness can make a massive difference. Learning how to live with a brain tumour is a huge step into the unknown, but your support can help people to adjust and move forward.

JOIN A VOLUNTARY FUNDRAISING GROUP

Charities such as CLIC Sargent have fundraising groups run by volunteers, who organise events up and down the country. There are different roles you can perform, whether you want to lead a group or be in charge of the banking processes, so get in touch if you have skills that you think could be useful.

HELP OUT AT A WAREHOUSE

Lots of charities run online shops as well as stores on the high street, forming a vital element of their fundraising efforts. From organising stock to packing orders when they come in, your time and efforts can help a charity's fundraising operations flow smoothly. If you've had experience of operating an online store or website, you may be able to help out in other ways too.

THINGS TO KNOW BEFORE YOU VOLUNTEER

  • Helping cancer patients can be upsetting at times, but this isn't a reason to stop you from volunteering. Your empathy can be a huge help to patients and their families, and you will receive training to help you cope with your own emotions.
  • Because of the training some roles require, charities might expect you to make a minimum time commitment, which may be around three months. You can still be flexible with when and for how long each week you volunteer.

WHERE TO GET STARTED

If you're interested in getting involved with brain tumour support, there are plenty of great charities you can help. To get you started, we've provided a few who are always looking for volunteers below:

You can also show your support by signing up to play People's Postcode Lottery. Our players have raised over £20 Million so far for these three charities alone.